2006 U.S. Congressional Elections

Wednesday, November 8, 2006

Contents

  • 1 Issues
  • 2 Campaigns turn nasty
  • 3 Polling Problems
  • 4 Summaries by state
  • 5 Alabama
  • 6 Alaska
  • 7 Arizona
  • 8 Arkansas
  • 9 California
  • 10 Colorado
  • 11 Connecticut
  • 12 Delaware
  • 13 Florida
  • 14 Georgia
  • 15 Hawaii
  • 16 Idaho
  • 17 Illinois
  • 18 Indiana
  • 19 Iowa
  • 20 Kansas
  • 21 Kentucky
  • 22 Louisiana
  • 23 Maine
  • 24 Maryland
  • 25 Massachusetts
  • 26 Michigan
  • 27 Minnesota
  • 28 Mississippi
  • 29 Missouri
  • 30 Montana
  • 31 Nebraska
  • 32 Nevada
  • 33 New Hampshire
  • 34 New Jersey
  • 35 New Mexico
  • 36 New York
  • 37 North Carolina
  • 38 North Dakota
  • 39 Ohio
  • 40 Oklahoma
  • 41 Oregon
  • 42 Pennsylvania
  • 43 Rhode Island
  • 44 South Carolina
  • 45 South Dakota
  • 46 Tennessee
  • 47 Texas
  • 48 Utah
  • 49 Vermont
  • 50 Virginia
  • 51 Washington
  • 52 West Virginia
  • 53 Wisconsin
  • 54 Wyoming
  • 55 American Samoa
  • 56 District of Columbia
  • 57 Guam
  • 58 Virgin Islands
  • 59 Sources

As of 10:00 p.m EST November 8, 2006, the Democratic Party is projected to have gained control of both the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate in the 2006 United States general elections. MSNBC projects that the Democrats now control 234 seats in the House of Representatives, 16 more seats than the 218 needed to control the House of Representatives as all 435 seats were up for election. In the Senate, where the balance of power is closer, one-third of all seats were up for grab. As of 10:00 p.m. EST, AP and Reuters were projecting that the Democrats had picked up all six seats they needed to retake the Senate, including the seats of incumbents Rick Santorum (Penn.), Lincoln Chafee (R.I.), Jim Talent (Missouri), Mike DeWine (Ohio), John Tester (Montana), and Jim Webb (VA). The Tester victory by less than 3,000 votes was projected at approximately 2 p.m. EST after the State of Montana announced the results of overnight recounts. Democrat Jim Webb has prevailed in that race by slightly more than 7,000 votes, though his opponent has not conceded and a recount may still occur.

3 Retro Lamps That Will Add Pizzazz To Your Home Decor

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By Mark Clifton

It seems that history always repeats itself, whether in a family, politics or even style and fashion. Slowly the clothing styles of the 50s, 60s, 70s and even (oh, no) the 80s have doubled back and been passed off as the hottest new fashions. This is equally true for interior design. It seems that people get tired of looking at the new designs, which have become old, and they want something newwhich is really just more of the old. Its a vicious cycle.

Retro furniture, lamps and other interior decorating favorites may be gone, but never forgotten. It doesnt take very many tries to find a website or retailer that specializes in retro furniture. Retro lamps are particularly fun because of the bright colors and crazy shapes they can be. Especially in the 1960s and 70s, anything could be fashionable, and just about everything was. Colors we wouldnt dream of using in our homes today were splashed all over the walls and the carpet looked like it needed to be mowed. But that was the style, and its not hard to find again.

The 1960s is when the interior design world first got a glimpse at the cone lamp. This retro lamp sported three or more adjustable cone shaped lights that rested on three separate arms protruding from the base of the lamp. The arms could be bent and turned in any direction to point light at anywhere you wanted it to go. This style has hung on throughout the years if for nothing else but its ingenious design. Though the idea is still used today, the original lamp gets a spot in the retro hall of fame, especially if you can find it in avocado green.

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Another fabulously retro lamp that we can thank the 1970s for is the Modern Arco Lamp. Why in the world would you want to have a perfectly straight lamp on the left side of your chair for reading when you can have this retro lamp sitting on your right and arcing over your head to end up on your left side? Any retro decorated room is incomplete without one of these monsters; just make sure you have the room for a retro lamp as big as this.

Yet another retro lamp that has actually had a huge impact on todays lamp styles is the torch floor lamp from the 1950s. Though there were torchiere lamps before that time, this design modernized it into a style that is still quite popular. Now you can find torchiere lamps with a variety of energy saving bulbs from compact fluorescent to halogen. Its really not a retro lamp, but deserves to be recognized for its pioneering efforts toward todays interior decorating.

If youre looking to use retro lamps in your design scheme, there are more than enough out there to choose from, and most are being produced today so you dont have to spend a killing at an antique store. Just do yourself a favor and stay away from lava lamps. There is retro, and just plain ugly, you decide.

Mark(at)modernlampsguide.com

About the Author: Add

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At least four dead and hundreds of homes destroyed after week of wildfires rage throughout Texas

Friday, September 9, 2011

Parts of Texas have been scorched by sweeping wildfires this week. Officials state that a wildfire which swept much of central Texas this week destroyed at least 1,400 homes and forced about 5,000 people to evacuate to safety. An official with the Texas Forestry Services told news sources on Thursday that much of that fire has been contained.

Officials have speculated that this fire alone has destroyed more homes than any other wildfire on record in the state. Officials are welcoming dropping temperatures, stating this will increase their ability to fight the fires effectively. A converted DC-10 aircraft was recently made available to fire authorities, but cannot be used until Friday as workers still need to time to prepare on-board equipment.

One of the two fatalities in the central part of the state has been identified as Michael Troy Farr, 49, who died at his home. Earlier in the week, a woman and her infant died in a related blaze that quickly engulfed their home located near the city of Gladewater, located in the eastern part of the state. On Thursday, officials warned that East Texas has become the center of wildfire activity in the state.

At least 170 wildfires have ravaged much of the state over the past week. On Tuesday, a thick haze of smoke enveloped the city of Tyler for several hours, forcing school officials to cancel all outdoor sports activities. Since late 2010 the overall devastation of wildfires in the state is estimated to cost at least US$216 million (£136 million,€157.5 million) in firefighting expenses. The state’s Lieutenant Governor, David Dewhurst, who is the acting governor in Governor Perry’s absence, indicated he will ask the federal government to declare Texas a major disaster area. President Obama has also promised to provide needed assistance to local officials.